Foxhound on Beacon Hill needs a loving home

Abbey needs a home. Do you need a dog to love?
Abbey needs a home. Do you need a dog to love?
(Editor’s note: We have been told that because Abbey was adopted from the Seattle Humane Society, her adoption contract requires that she be returned to the shelter for rehoming, and the shelter will find her a good home and make sure that her new family are aware of any issues related to her breed or behavioral profile. Thanks everyone for reading this and caring about Abbey!)

Andrew Crowder sent this message to the Beacon Hill mailing list:

Last year my wife and I rescued a wonderful 2 year old fox hound from the Humane Society. We named her Abbey and she is a very good companion. However, as we are expecting a baby girl in December, Abbey will be too much for us to manage while attending to an infant. If you are a walker or runner, she is an ideal training partner. I take her out on a 2 – 4 mile run (rain or shine) at least 3 days a week and she loves being outdoors.

If Abbey sounds like she may be compatible to your lifestyle, or if you know someone looking for a pet, I strongly encourage you to first check out a description of her breed [See American Foxhound]. Also, if you own a cat, ferret or a similar non-canine creature, then a foxhound under the same roof is simply not a good idea.

One important necessity for her breed is a tall enclosed fence with no escape routes while you are away. If left alone for long periods, the fox hound will get bored and become curious to explore the various interesting scents wafting through the neighborhood. However as long as people are at home, Abbey has no incentive to run off and contents herself with sleeping on her cushion, that is, after you’ve taken her out to play. When people are around, she is a very good indoor dog.

We have grown very attached to her, and want to ensure that she finds a suitable home that would be conducive to mutual happiness with her owner(s).

Please respond to our email if you are interested in adopting Abbey: lacrowder@msn.com

— Andrew Crowder

3 thoughts on “Foxhound on Beacon Hill needs a loving home”

  1. First congratulations, second I don’t understand why people adopt a dog for the short-term. Its wholly unfair to the dog and selfish to determine that with your new baby you will not be able to manage your dog. By adopting a rescue you’ve made a committment to her. My husband and I are expecting our first child too and have two hounds; an American Foxhound & Blue tick coonhound (both rescues) and have no intention of giving them up.

    Abby looks like a beautiful dog and obviously deserves a better loving home, I hope she finds a forever one.
    Stacey

  2. My wife and I have decided to keep Abbey. In order to avoid returning her to the stresses of a new adoption process, we recently made a final adjustment to our dog containment situation which (for now) has been working. I’d like to set the record straight. In this last year I had tried several methods to keep her from getting out, including raised fencing, behavioral modification and a dog run with a cable. Nonetheless, while we were at work Abbey still managed to escape after several of my containment ‘solutions’. Luckily she was not stolen or hit by a car, which is always our greatest concern. Keep in mind people, it was concern for her safety that led us to post the ad, not the aims of ‘selfish’ and ‘irresponsible’ new parents who disregard for the lives of animals. After each of Abbey’s escapes, we were reminded of the goodness of neighbors who cared for her until I could get her home safely. I’m sure that some who are eager to blame me for not “preventing” these escapes simply won’t allow for one’s failure to recognize that there are dogs capable of finding ways to jump over six foot fences (My skin has grown thick enough by now to no longer care about criticisms about my character when they are based on erroneous assumptions about me). Through this process of keeping Abbey I have since learned to “let go” of being a complete ‘dog containment control freak’ which now means that Abbey and her faithful sidekick Ringo (our cocker spaniel) are soon to em-bark on a new shared journey with baby in tow. I have learned that the majority of people on Beacon Hill are generous and neighbors worth knowing. And a special thanks to those of you who helped us post this ad, and to those who have offered us helpful information along with your encouragement.

    Your kindness and trust in us being decent, responsible and human reflect two admirable facts about yourselves that I believe go beyond the ‘animal rights’ issue of the surface: (1) you are respectful toward neighbors when they ask for help even before knowing all the facts of their situation (2) you are secure in yourselves and balanced in your views (on a range of topics) to the point where open dialogue and action become possible, which naturally tends all of us as neighbors towards progress. Thanks again, -Andrew

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