Tag Archives: pets

Mean cat bullies humans and cats alike

Neighbor Kasey writes with a plea for feline peace. Is this about your cat?

There’s a cat in our part of the neighborhood (19th and Stevens) that has shown aggression toward felines and humans alike. Not a night goes by without the terrifying sounds of a cat fight alerting all of the dogs on the block. This buff-colored, medium-haired cat is small to medium in size and ruthlessly stalks indoor/outdoor kitties. My own cat has been bullied by the predator for about the last four months and I can’t seem to get it to leave him or our yard alone. He or she has also fought with our housemates’ cat as well.

I wish I had more information to share, but I would really appreciate taking the chance that the cat’s owner isn’t aware of how mean it is to other animals. I don’t want to see it end up at the Seattle Animal Shelter, but that’s my next call.

Save the date: Rizal Off-Leash Area public meeting 10/20

The proposed reconfiguration of the Jose Rizal Park Off-Leash Area was not presented at last night’s North Beacon Hill Council meeting as was previously scheduled. Instead, Brenda Kramer from Seattle Parks and Recreation announced that there will be a public meeting held on October 20 at Jefferson Community Center to discuss the new plan.

Kramer told the neighbors in attendance, including a quite a few who were there to protest the proposed park shrinkage, that the plan for the Off-Leash Area (OLA) is currently being redesigned and Parks wants input from park users.

Several neighbors did speak up at the meeting to express their wish to keep the Off-Leash Area large. One neighbor said that other OLAs are small, and the Jose Rizal Park OLA is “a jewel” for the city because of its larger size. She added that dog parks are amenities to a neighborhood that are equivalent to light rail stations or grocery stores.

Another neighbor added: “You have a duty as a city to provide canine infrastructure. Unfortunately, the Olmsted Brothers did not forsee that need.”

Kramer, Deputy Mayor Darryl Smith, and other city representatives in attendance emphasized that those interested in the dog park should attend the October 20 meeting to provide input. The meeting will most likely be from 7-8 p.m., but stay tuned to the Beacon Hill Blog for further information as the date draws closer.

Beacon Bits: liquor license, Food Forest, and Maple mural

The Bartell Drug Store at Rainier Avenue South and South College Street has applied for a new “Grocery Store – Beer/Wine” liquor license. If you wish to comment on the application, you can email your comments about license number 406481 to customerservice@liq.wa.gov.

Thanks to Shelly Bates!

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The proposed Jefferson Park Food Forest has a new website with information about the Food Forest’s design and mission.

Thanks to Joel Lee!

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Maple Elementary School is working on a mural project. Students, parents, and community members of all races will work together to create a mural for the school gym exterior that reflects the significance of The Maple Creed: “I know that our country was built by people of all races and I know that people of all races keep our country great.”

Community tile creation and tile glazing sessions will be held on the following Mondays from 3:30 – 8:30 pm: May 3, 10, 17, 24; June 7, 14. There will also be sessions on the following Saturdays from 10:00 am – 2:00 pm: May 1, 22.

RSVPs are requested. To find out more about the project and RSVP, contact Terry Virdell at 206-898-5679, or email terryvirdell@gmail.com.

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L to R: Representatives Bob Hasegawa and Zack Hudgins.
Local state Representatives Zack Hudgins and Bob Hasegawa invite residents of the 11th Legislative District to join them for a telephone town hall tonight, April 27, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Hudgins and Hasegawa will discuss the 2010 legislative session, creating jobs, their priorities for the 2010 state budget, and the budget’s impact on local communities. Residents will be invited to stay on the line and join in on the conversation. You can also phone in directly between 6:00 and 7:00 p.m. by dialing (toll-free) 877-229-8493, code 15512.

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Last week, Cienna Madrid at the Stranger wrote about the new Streets for All Seattle Coalition, a group fighting to fund projects for bicycle, transit, and pedestrian improvements. In the article, SASC spokesman David Hiller specifically discusses how a transportation crisis in South Seattle has drawn organizations such as El Centro de la Raza into the coalition.

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Gardeners take note — @VictrolaCoffee posted on Twitter: “Free bags of coffee grounds everyday at Victrola Beacon Hill – 3215 Beacon Ave So. – make your gardens grow!”

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Please be careful with your pets. King County Animal Care and Control sent out a recent notice that there may be an outbreak of canine distemper in area raccoons. This disease is highly contagious among dogs, ferrets, and a variety of wild animals. Cats are not affected.

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Asian Express, Dim Sum House, and Jefferson Community Center all received recent inspection visits from the Health Department. (Click each establishment’s name to see the results.) Congratulations to Jefferson Community Center for a perfect score of zero!

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The Seattle City Council and Mayor will host a joint public meeting about the City’s budget here on Beacon Hill at the New Holly Gathering Hall, tomorrow, April 28, at 5:00 pm. The New Holly Gathering Hall is located at
7054 32nd Avenue South.

A photographic look back at 2009 on Beacon Hill

During the last year, many of you have contributed amazing photos to the Beacon Hill Blog photo pool on Flickr. The photos you see here today were chosen from the nearly 700 photos that were taken and posted in the photo pool during 2009. Some were chosen because of their photographic beauty; others, because they captured newsworthy moments on the Hill. Some of these we’ve published before, and some we haven’t.

We would like to thank all of our wonderful Beacon Hill photographers for posting photos to the pool and their generosity in allowing us to share them with you. We hope you enjoy this look back at 2009. Happy New Year!

A foggy morning at Beacon Hill Playfield in January. Photo by Bridget Christian.

Enjoying the horsie ride at the Red Apple. Photo by melissajonas.

Keeping cool in a Beacon Hill condo pool, late July. Photo by Bridget Christian.

A door opened in the July heat at Kusina Filipina. Photo by l0st2.

Waiting to try the new light rail train on opening weekend at Beacon Hill Station. Photo by Jason.

Continue reading A photographic look back at 2009 on Beacon Hill

Cat adoptathon, ROCKiT grand opening this weekend

You know you want one. Photo by Kpjas.
You know you want one. Photo by Kpjas.
The Seattle Animal Shelter Cat Adoptathon returns to our neighborhood this Saturday, from noon to 3:00 pm at the Jefferson Community Center, 3801 Beacon Avenue South. There will be cats of many breeds available.

Adoption prices for cats range from $102 to $107, and include:

  • Initial vaccinations
  • Deworming
  • Feline Leukemia testing
  • Certificate for free health exam at local veterinarians
  • Spay or neuter
  • Microchip
  • Two-year Seattle Pet License (if applicable)

Also this weekend, ROCKiT space (in the old Buggy location, 3315 Beacon Avenue South) is holding their grand opening event, both Saturday and Sunday. ROCKiT space is a non-profit organization devoted to making music and art accessible to all. They have equipment and space available to members, including musical instruments and P.A. equipment, art supplies, books, rehearsal space, performance space, and more. This weekend they will have “neat stuff for all ages including pumpkin carving, a costume exchange (bring your spare costume stuff!), live music and much more.”

Walking with Tica: the other side of the leash

Even on dark winter mornings, dogs like Tica need their exercise. Photo by melissajonas.
Even on dark winter mornings, dogs like Tica need their exercise. Photo by melissajonas.
All of my posts so far have been about me and my experiences as a pedestrian and neighbor in Beacon Hill.  I’d like to share some of my observations about sharing my life with an athletic, social animal.

Tica turned 10 in June.  She’s still active and continues to demand (and deserve) regular exercise, but at a much more gentle pace.  We go out for 20-30 minutes in the morning and again in the evening.  From age 1-5, Tica had to be engaged for at least a couple of hours every day.   She is a smart, social dog and it was fun to find ways to keep her entertained.  It was also a lot of work.  I trained Tica using a “clicker” and positive training methods.  This approach worked miracles with my high-energy dog.  Using positive methods strengthened our relationship and helped Tica become more trusting of strangers.  Clicker Solutions is one of many online resources for this method.

My mantra in those years was “a tired dog is a good dog.” When Tica was younger, she got bored easily.  When she was bored, she’d find ways to get my attention–barking, whining, digging, chewing… behaviors I couldn’t ignore.  I realized that keeping her busy on my terms was a lot easier than trying to deal with her behavior after she got bored.

If you have a spring puppy, you’ve probably both been basking in the incredible weather.  It’s easy (and fun!) to take long walks and extended trips to the dog park while the sun is shining.  It’s a lot more effort when the sun goes down at 5:45 and the puddles are past your ankles.  Make the effort to keep your dog active–it pays off!

Wondering how you’re going to keep your dog active & happy this winter?

  • Wear a watch. Make a commitment to take the dog out every day. Most experts recommend 60-90 minutes, especially for high energy and/or younger dogs.  You know your dog and your lifestyle.  Set a goal and stick to it.
  • Dress appropriately. You’re more likely to take the dog out if you’re comfortable.  Wear weather appropriate shoes, invest in a good raincoat, and get several hats.  Keep visibility in mind–you want drivers to see you on dark November afternoons.  I don’t wear headphones because I want to be aware of my surroundings.
  • Keep your dog safe and comfortable. Some breeds are prone to ear infections, especially in wet climates.  Watch for discharge coming out of the ears and/or extra scratching.  Some breeds (Greyhounds, pit bulls, etc) need a sweater or rain coat to stay dry and warm on long walks.  Talk to your vet if you have concerns.
  • Trade doggy play dates and/or get together with a friend. Take turns bringing the dogs to the park, or simply getting them together to run around in the backyard.  You’re less likely to put off that walk when you’ve made a commitment to another human.
  • Play indoor games with your pooch.  Teach new tricks, hide dog treats behind the couch or in the bathtub, or practice a quiet “down, stay” while you’re making dinner.  Mental stimulation and social interaction keep dogs busy & happy.  Your dog still needs to go outside–but make the most of indoor time, too.
  • Take classes. Seattle has too many dog resources to list.  Agility, obedience, herding, conformation…there’s bound to be something you and your dog will both enjoy.  Many classes are in a covered or indoor area.
  • Hire a professional. If you’re too stretched for time to meet your dog’s needs, consider paying for a dog walker or taking your pup to a doggy daycare.  A responsible teenage neighbor might just be the perfect answer for getting your dog out of the house.  Be sure to interview critically–this person is going to be alone with your pet and may have access to your home.  Check references.

In every season, remember to be a responsible neighbor: carry bags and clean up after your dog, keep her leashed, and be respectful of others.  Many people are afraid of dogs–including some dog owners.   Tica is medium sized by my standards (45lbs), but to some people she looks intimidating.  I don’t force the issue.  Observe dog and human body language and keep your dog under control.

It takes a village…

A new baby, illness, injury, increased or changed work schedule… sometimes there are times when the responsibilities of a pet are too much. If you need help, ask.  If your neighbor needs help, offer.   A dog walking service is a great baby shower gift!  There are also lots of pet charities who need your support.  Donate food, litter, and other supplies to help others care for their pets.  Encourage your animal-loving student to consider volunteering at a shelter when assigned community service projects.

Beacon Bits: foster fashion, home values, and music at the park

Neighbors on 12th Avenue South enjoyed the Night Out block party last Tuesday. Photo by Bridget Christian.
Neighbors on 12th Avenue South enjoyed the Night Out block party last Tuesday. Photo by Bridget Christian.
Neighbor Brook writes with an interesting observation about Beacon Hill real estate prices on Zillow:

“Every other neighborhood I’ve checked has followed pretty much the same curve, but North Beacon Hill and Columbia City each have unique curves. They’ve settled into a flatter line where average house values are now just above values in Greenwood. The other exception about North Beacon Hill is that it flattened out in 2006. Maybe the start of the subprime meltdown was felt in the neighborhood first, or maybe it was buyers getting scared away by the giant blue walls, but either way we were spared the last gasp of superheated speculation. Either way, it totally bucked the trend.”

What does this mean? Perhaps the beginning of the much-heralded light rail-powered price increase? We don’t know, but it’s interesting.

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The cat adoptathon we mentioned the other day was a success! We’re told there were 15 kitties adopted. If you missed your chance to bring home a kitty, there will be another adoptathon on October 10 from noon to 3:00 pm at the Jefferson Community Center, 3801 Beacon Avenue South.

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Project Treehouse will feature local celebrities escorting 14 specially-styled foster kids down the runway on Wednesday, August 12, from 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm at Treehouse, 2100 24th Avenue South. The event is aimed at raising awareness for Treehouse’s free Wearhouse store which serves nearly 3,000 foster kids every year by providing them with new and like-new clothing, school supplies, and other things that kids need.
 

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The Rainier Valley Post has some great pictures of last Saturday’s Jose Rizal Music and Arts Festival at Jose Rizal Park. We were unable to be there, but it looks like everyone had a good time and enjoyed some great music!

Give a kitty a good home this Saturday

Photo by Sam Holland.
Photo by Sam Holland.
You want a cute kitty like this, don’t you? The Seattle Animal Shelter is making it easy for you to bring a cat home, by hosting a cat adoptathon here in Southeast Seattle this Saturday, August 8. The event is from noon to 3:00 pm at the Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Avenue South. There will be cats of many different breeds available.

Adoption prices range from $102 to $107, and include:

  • Initial vaccinations
  • Deworming
  • Feline Leukemia testing
  • Certificate for free health exam at local veterinarians
  • Spay or neuter
  • Microchip
  • Two-year Seattle Pet License (if applicable)

Walking with Tica: Exploring the neighborhood

A white kitty watches as Tica and Melissa walk by. Photo by melissajonas.
A white kitty watches as Tica and Melissa walk by. Photo by melissajonas.
Like several thousand of our neighbors, we rode the new Sound Transit trains on July 18. There were so many people in Beacon Hill (literally inside the hill) that first weekend–and it went so smoothly. I am proud of our neighborhood and proud of our city. Congratulations us!

What does Link light rail have to do with walking my dog? The streets around the station have been opened up. We adapted to the construction–traffic, streets and sidewalks blocked, noise, and the visual obstruction of the big blue wall. It’s been six years that we haven’t been able to walk along Lander. Six years that we’ve had to crisscross McClellan to get to Red Apple from the west side of Beacon.

Those of you with dogs probably understand how easy it is to get into a routine (some might say rut) and walk the same route every day. We walk by the same houses, sniff the same bushes, greet the same dogs… it can get dull. As of now, we have new choices! Getting across Beacon doesn’t involve dodging big trucks.

I posted several new pictures to the Beacon Hill Blog Flickr pool from our July 18 walk. We met new neighbors and noticed new kitties and discovered some really fun lawn art.

Take advantage of the weather and the newly-restored intersections to explore a new section of Beacon Hill this week–and bring your camera. Let’s see what we can find!